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Inflammation- The Root Cause of Disease

The word “inflammation” traces back to the Latin for “set afire.” In some conditions, like rheumatoid arthritis, you feel heat, pain, redness, and swelling.

But in other cases — like heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and diabetes — it’s not so obvious. If you didn’t go looking for it with tests, you wouldn’t even know it’s there, but the effects can be life threatening.

𝗖𝗮𝗻 𝗜𝘁 𝗕𝗲 𝗚𝗼𝗼𝗱 𝗙𝗼𝗿 𝗬𝗼𝘂?

Inflammation actually is good in the short run. It’s part of your immune system’s natural response to heal an injury or fight an infection. It’s supposed to stop after that. But if it becomes a long-lasting habit in your body, that can be bad for you. Long-term, or “chronic,” inflammation is seen in many diseases and conditions.

𝗜𝘁 𝗖𝗮𝗻 𝗟𝗲𝗮𝗱 𝗧𝗼 𝗔 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗿𝘁 𝗔𝘁𝘁𝗮𝗰𝗸

Inflamed arteries are common among people with heart disease. Some researchers think that when fats build up in the walls of the heart’s coronary arteries, the body fires back with inflammatory chemicals since it sees this as an “injury” to the heart. That could trigger a blood clot that causes a heart attack or stroke.

𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗗𝗶𝗮𝗯𝗲𝘁𝗲𝘀 𝗖𝗼𝗻𝗻𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻

Inflammation and type 2 diabetes are linked. Doctors don’t know yet if it causes the disease. Some experts say obesity triggers the inflammation, which makes it harder for the body to use insulin. That may be one reason losing extra weight and keeping it off is a key step to lower your chance of getting type 2 diabetes.

𝗬𝗲𝘀, 𝗜𝘁’𝘀 𝗘𝘃𝗲𝗻 𝗧𝗶𝗲𝗱 𝗧𝗼 𝗔𝗹𝘇𝗵𝗲𝗶𝗺𝗲𝗿’𝘀

Chronic brain inflammation is often seen in people with this type of dementia. Scientists don’t yet understand exactly how that works, but inflammation may play an active role in the disease. Experts are studying whether anti-inflammatory medicine will curb Alzheimer’s. So far, the results are mixed.

𝗜𝘁 𝗖𝗮𝗻 𝗔𝗹𝘀𝗼 𝗛𝘂𝗿𝘁 𝗬𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗚𝘂𝘁

Chronic inflammation is tied to ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, which are types of inflammatory bowel disease. It happens when your body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the healthy bacteria in your gut, and causes inflammation that sticks around. You could have symptoms such as belly pain, cramping, and diarrhea.

𝗜𝗻 𝗥𝗵𝗲𝘂𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗼𝗶𝗱 𝗔𝗿𝘁𝗵𝗿𝗶𝘁𝗶𝘀, 𝗜𝘁 𝗗𝗼𝗲𝘀 𝗗𝗮𝗺𝗮𝗴𝗲

What many people think of as “arthritis” is osteoarthritis, in which the tissue that cushions joints, cartilage, breaks down, particularly as people age. Rheumatoid arthritis is different. In RA, the immune system attacks your body’s joints, causing inflammation that can harm them — and even the heart. Symptoms include pain, stiffness, and red, warm, swollen joints.

𝗜𝘀 𝗜𝘁 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝘁 𝗢𝗳 𝗙𝗶𝗯𝗿𝗼𝗺𝘆𝗮𝗹𝗴𝗶𝗮?

This condition can cause pain, tenderness, and fatigue, but not because of inflammation. Unlike in RA, inflammation doesn’t attack the joints in fibromyalgia. Someone who has fibro could have inflammation in their body from another illness. But it’s not driving their fibro.

𝗪𝗵𝗲𝗻 𝗜𝘁 𝗛𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗲𝗻𝘀 𝗙𝗮𝘀𝘁

Sometimes inflammation strikes suddenly when your body is fighting an infection. Maybe it’s cellulitis, a skin infection, or appendicitis, which affects your appendix. You’ll need to see your doctor to get the right treatment quickly.

𝗪𝗛𝗔𝗧 𝗖𝗔𝗡 𝗬𝗢𝗨 𝗗𝗢?

𝗚𝗲𝘁 𝗦𝗼𝗺𝗲 𝗦𝗹𝗲𝗲𝗽

Mom was right: You need to get your rest. Research shows that when healthy people are sleep-deprived, they have more inflammation. Exactly how that works isn’t clear, but it may be related to metabolism. It’s one more reason to make sleep a priority!

𝗬𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗗𝗶𝗲𝘁 𝗠𝗮𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿𝘀

The types of food you eat affect how much inflammation you have. Get plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, plant-based proteins (like beans and nuts), fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids (such as salmon, tuna, and sardines), and healthier oils, like olive oil. Also eat foods with probiotics, like yogurt (just check that it doesn’t have too much sugar). Limit saturated fats, found in meats, whole-fat dairy products, and processed foods.

𝗦𝘁𝗮𝘆 𝗔𝗰𝘁𝗶𝘃𝗲

Even if you have a condition like RA, in which inflammation is a problem, exercise is still good for you. If you make it a habit, it pays off in many ways. For instance, it helps you stick to a healthy weight, which is another good way to keep inflammation in check. Ask your doctor what types of activities are best for you.

𝗦𝗺𝗼𝗸𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗠𝗮𝗸𝗲𝘀 𝗜𝘁 𝗪𝗼𝗿𝘀𝗲

Lighting up is a sure-fire way to raise inflammation. Like most people who try to kick the habit, it may take you several tries before you quit for good — but keep trying! Tell your doctor it’s a goal and ask for her advice.

𝗖𝗲𝗿𝘁𝗮𝗶𝗻 𝗛𝗲𝗿𝗯𝗮𝗹 𝗥𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗱𝗶𝗲𝘀 𝗛𝗲𝗹𝗽!

Turmeric (which gives curry powder its orange-yellow color) has anti-inflammation perks. So do ginger, boswellia serrata, cinnamon, clove, and black pepper. Scientists are studying how much it takes to make a difference. These herbal remedies are generally safe to enjoy in foods or in supplements, but ask your doctor first. He or she can check on whether these herbal remedies might affect any medicines you take or conditions you have.

𝗪𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗧𝗼 𝗞𝗻𝗼𝘄 𝗔𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗡𝗦𝗔𝗜𝗗𝘀

Many people take NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) to tame inflammation and ease pain. Some of these meds need a prescription. Others, like ibuprofen and naproxen, are sold over the counter. They work well, but if you take them regularly, tell your doctor, because they can cause stomach problems, like ulcers or bleeding. Some types of NSAIDS may increase the risk of heart attack or stroke, so talk to your doctor about the safest options.

𝗢𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝗜𝗻𝗳𝗹𝗮𝗺𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗙𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗡𝗮𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗮𝗹 𝗥𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗱𝗶𝗲𝘀

The omega-3s in fish such as salmon and tuna can dial down inflammation. Fish oil can help, too. People who are low in vitamin D also tend to have more inflammation than others. It’s not yet clear if taking more vitamin D fixes that. Remember, it’s a good idea to ask your doctor first.

𝗢𝗨𝗥 𝗦𝗨𝗣𝗣𝗟𝗘𝗠𝗘𝗡𝗧 𝗙𝗢𝗥 𝗜𝗡𝗙𝗟𝗔𝗠𝗠𝗔𝗧𝗜𝗢𝗡 𝗦𝗨𝗙𝗙𝗘𝗥𝗘𝗥𝗦-

In the next few weeks we will introduce 𝗠𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗧𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝗧𝘂𝗿𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰 for sale on our website and on Amazon.

𝗠𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗧𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝗧𝘂𝗿𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰 contains a powerful combination of herbal remedies that naturally and effectively combat inflammation to address these and other health issues:

• Osteoarthritis: Plant compounds in turmeric that include curcumin can reduce markers of inflammation and thus relieve osteoarthritis symptoms

• Obesity: Turmeric and curcumin may inhibit the inflammatory pathway involved in obesity and may help regulate body fat

• Heart disease: Turmeric and curcumin can reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and reduce the risk of heart disease as a result

• Diabetes: Turmeric and curcumin can improve blood sugar metabolism and potentially reduce the effects of diabetes on your body

• Liver: A rat study found that turmeric extract and curcumin were protective against chronic liver damage by helping reduce harmful oxidative stress

• Cancer: Though research is still in its early stages, turmeric and curcumin may reduce the activity of colon and other cancer cells

• Antibacterial: Turmeric and curcumin have strong antibacterial effects. They can reduce the growth of many disease-causing bacteria

𝗠𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗧𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝗧𝘂𝗿𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰 comes in capsule form and contains all of these herbal anti-inflammatory, pain fighting ingredients:

• Turmeric (95% Curcumin)
• Boswellia Serrata
• White Willow Bark
• BioPerine (black pepper extract)

Source: AustinThyroid.com

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