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Menopause- Symptoms, Remedies, & Foods To Avoid

Sorry guys, this article is strictly for the ladies. That being said, you men can benefit from knowing this information too, particularly if you’re dating or married to a woman that’s going through menopause currently as it will hopefully make you more compassionate toward your partner’s hormonal changes.

As women age, the dreaded life changing event called menopause can cause all sorts of troubling symptoms, such as:

 fatigue
 hot flashes
 night sweats
 osteoporosis
 sweating
 painful intercourse
 insomnia
 dryness or loss of scalp hair
 anxiety
 dry skin
 irritability
 moodiness
 reduced sex drive
 vaginal dryness

PHEW! Is it any wonder given all these potential symptoms that women fear this stage of life?

𝗧𝗥𝗘𝗔𝗧𝗠𝗘𝗡𝗧𝗦-

You may need treatment if your symptoms are severe or affecting your quality of life. Hormone therapy may be an effective treatment in women under the age of 60, or within 10 years of menopause onset.

𝗔𝗱𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝗺𝗲𝗱𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝘀𝗼𝗺𝗲𝘁𝗶𝗺𝗲𝘀 𝘂𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗺𝗲𝗻𝗼𝗽𝗮𝘂𝘀𝗲 𝘀𝘆𝗺𝗽𝘁𝗼𝗺𝘀 𝗶𝗻𝗰𝗹𝘂𝗱𝗲:

 topical minoxidil 5 percent, used once daily for hair thinning and loss

 antidandruff shampoos, commonly ketoconazole 2 percent and zinc pyrithione 1 percent, used for hair loss

 eflornithine hydrochloride topical cream for unwanted hair growth

 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), commonly paroxetine 7.5 milligrams for hot flashes, anxiety, and depression

 nonhormonal vaginal moisturizers and lubricants
low-dose estrogen-based vaginal lubricants in the form of a cream, ring, or tablet

 ospemifene for vaginal dryness and painful intercourse

 prophylactic antibiotics for recurrent UTIs

 sleep medications for insomnia

 denosumab, teriparatide, raloxifene, or calcitonin for postmenstrual osteoporosis

𝗘𝗫𝗘𝗥𝗖𝗜𝗦𝗜𝗡𝗚 𝗔𝗡𝗗 𝗠𝗔𝗡𝗔𝗚𝗜𝗡𝗚 𝗬𝗢𝗨𝗥 𝗪𝗘𝗜𝗚𝗛𝗧-

Reduce your daily calorie intake by 400 to 600 calories to help manage your weight. It’s also important to exercise moderately for 20 to 30 minutes a day. This can help:

 increase energy
 promote a better night’s sleep
 improve mood
 promote your general well-being

𝗦𝗨𝗣𝗣𝗟𝗘𝗠𝗘𝗡𝗧𝗜𝗡𝗚 𝗬𝗢𝗨𝗥 𝗗𝗜𝗘𝗧-

Take calcium, vitamin D, and magnesium supplements to help reduce your risk for osteoporosis and improve energy levels and sleep. Talk to your doctor about supplements that can help you with your individual health needs.

𝗙𝗢𝗢𝗗𝗦 𝗧𝗢 𝗔𝗩𝗢𝗜𝗗 𝗗𝗨𝗥𝗜𝗡𝗚 𝗠𝗘𝗡𝗢𝗣𝗔𝗨𝗦𝗘-

Eating less-than-healthy foods as you move through menopause can worsen bothersome symptoms, such as hot flashes and insomnia. Knowing what to avoid could make this natural transition much more manageable.

Following a healthy, well-balanced diet is a good idea in general, but it’s especially true for women who are nearing or have just passed through menopause, says Amy Jamieson-Petonic, RD, a nutritionist and exercise physiologist in Cleveland.

“Good nutrition can make a big change in how you feel with regard to menopause symptoms like mood swings, hot flashes, and exhaustion, as well as bloating and possible weight gain,” Jamieson-Petonic says. Women of menopausal age should make sure to eat plenty of whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, and lean protein for optimal health, she says.

𝗣𝗿𝗼𝗰𝗲𝘀𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗙𝗼𝗼𝗱𝘀

Potato chips and cookies might taste good, but they’re usually high in sodium, loaded with added sugars, or both, which can make you retain water and feel bloated, Jamieson-Petonic says. If you’re craving a snack, try a healthier alternative, like string cheese, carrots dipped in hummus, or a few whole-grain crackers with peanut butter — they’ll satisfy your need to nibble without filling you up with the symptom-trigger stuff.

𝗦𝗽𝗶𝗰𝘆 𝗙𝗼𝗼𝗱𝘀

Think twice before you add that extra-hot salsa to your taco. Foods that rate high on the heat scale can trigger sweating, flushing, and other symptoms of hot flashes, according to the National Institute on Aging. If you’re looking to add some kick to a bland dish, Jamieson-Petonic suggests skipping the jalapeños and sprinkling on spices that provide flavor without as much heat, like cumin, curry, turmeric, and basil.

𝗙𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗙𝗼𝗼𝗱

In a rush? Drive-through restaurants may be convenient when you’re short on time, but their meals often serve up a massive amount of fat, Jamieson-Petonic says. Fatty foods can increase your risk for heart disease, a condition that women are already at greater risk for after passing through menopause, according to the American Heart Association. “These foods also tend to promote weight gain, which can exacerbate menopause symptoms as well,” Jamieson-Petonic says. The better solution? Have quick, healthy foods on hand by freezing leftovers at home or packing a lunch. If you have to eat a meal on the fly, skip the cheeseburger and choose healthier menu options. A grilled chicken sandwich on a whole-grain bun with lettuce and tomato is a good alternative, she says.

𝗔𝗹𝗰𝗼𝗵𝗼𝗹

Although it may not be necessary to swear off all cocktails and wine, there are plenty of good reasons to keep your alcohol consumption moderate. As suggested in the 2015–2020 U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, moderate drinking for women is defined as one drink per day or less. Women who have two to five drinks a day have 1.5 times the risk for breast cancer as those who don’t drink at all, and heavy drinking can increase your risk for cardiovascular disease, according to the North American Menopause Society. Plus, some women find that alcohol makes them more susceptible to hot flashes, Jamieson-Petonic says.

“I tell women to listen to their bodies,” she says. “If alcohol aggravates their menopause symptoms they should try to avoid it.” If you still want to indulge occasionally, Jamieson-Petonic suggests trying a white wine spritzer with fruit, which is lower in alcohol than most standard drinks.

𝗖𝗮𝗳𝗳𝗲𝗶𝗻𝗲

Love your morning cup of joe? It could be worsening your menopause symptoms. A Mayo Clinic study published in February 2015 in the journal Menopause found that menopausal women who consumed caffeine were more likely to have hot flashes than women who didn’t consume caffeine. If you’re craving a warm drink, try a cup of hot ginger or peppermint tea — both caffeine-free — Jamieson-Petonic says. Or if you’re in need of some extra energy, try going for a quick walk instead of relying on caffeine for a kick.

𝗙𝗮𝘁𝘁𝘆 𝗠𝗲𝗮𝘁𝘀

Besides being high in saturated fat, foods like brisket and bacon can lower the body’s serotonin levels, Jamieson-Petonic says. “When serotonin drops, we feel angry, grumpy, and irritable,” she says. When you’re shopping for meats, skip the greasy, marbled cuts in favor of trimmer alternatives, like chicken, turkey, and ground beef that’s 90 percent lean or better.

The foods that are good for you during menopause are good for you at any stage in your life. Build healthy eating habits now and you’ll enjoy better health for years to come, including through menopause.

SOURCES: EverydayHealth.comHealthline.com

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