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OBESITY LINKED TO CANCER IN YOUNG ADULTS

In the United States, the percentage of children and adolescents affected by obesity has more than tripled since the 1970s. Data from 2015-2016 show that nearly 1 in 5 school age children and young people (6 to 19 years) in the United States has obesity.

•CDC defines overweight in children and young people as a BMI at or above the 85th percentile and less than the 95th percentile for young people of the same age and sex.

•CDC defines obesity in children and young people as BMI at or above the 95th percentile for young people of the same age and sex.

There are several reasons for the obesity epidemic. The type of recreational activities youth participate in coupled with the unfortunate change toward convenience over nutrition in our eating habits are both largely to blame.

The recent shift toward clean eating and an increased awareness of the health consequences involved with a diet of processed foods has been helpful for some populations but the problem still exists with America’s youth.

𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐲𝐥𝐞 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐝𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐝-

Childhood obesity is associated with a higher chance of premature death and disability in adulthood. Overweight and obese children are more likely to stay obese into adulthood and to develop noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age. For most NCDs resulting from obesity, the risks depend partly on the age of onset and on the duration of obesity. Obese children and adolescents suffer from both short-term and long-term health consequences.

The most significant health consequences of childhood overweight and obesity, that often do not become apparent until adulthood, include:

•𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐨𝐯𝐚𝐬𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐬

•𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐬

•𝐦𝐮𝐬𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐤𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐨𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐬

•𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐫

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